Aquaman Was … a Lot

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The term “guilty pleasure” gets tossed around a bit too much these days in the realm of entertainment. In my view, if a piece of entertainment, well, entertains you, there’s nothing to be guilty of.

Still, I understand where the term comes from, and a movie like Aquaman is virtually begging to be crowned as one of the best recent examples. It’s a movie a lot of people like, even while those same people acknowledge undeniable narrative flaws.

Some love Aquaman. Some hate it. I find myself floating somewhere in between the surface-level writing and the likable characters and the labrynthian world they inhabit.

Read on for my full breakdown, which separates The Packaging with The Writing to try to make sense of what works and what doesn’t in the latest attempt to right the ship that is the DC Extended Universe.

Continue reading “Aquaman Was … a Lot”

Spider-Man: Homecoming Understands its Hero … and Soars Because of It

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Spider-Man is and always has been my favorite superhero. Much of that is owed to growing up in the 90s and early aughts, but in my view, Spidey was the first hero to get right what a lot of the DC legends got wrong. Admiring a hero from afar is fine, but to get truly invested in one, you need to be able to sympathize with him. Peter Parker is the everyman. He’s the first comic book character whose true identity is more important than his heroic alter ego.

To date, none of his (now many) film iterations have managed to strike the balance between Peter and Spidey, human and hero while finding the melding point between the two, which is often as indistinguishable for the character as it is for the audience.

Yeah … they got it right.

Continue reading “Spider-Man: Homecoming Understands its Hero … and Soars Because of It”